Rick Scarpulla: Understanding How to Use Extra Workouts

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Extra Workouts in Action

Extra Workouts in Action

[M]any of my friends who coach at colleges or work with pro athletes find the same results: smaller quicker extra workouts are best served in smaller quicker doses.
Many top CF athletes utilize extra workouts, especially those who are in the competitive upper echelon or are working to get there. For example, Rich Froning documents that he will do a 2-a-day split workout: He will be in and out in under 30-40 minutes on one workout — many times he and his training partner will use this time to do “engine” work and spend 20+ minutes working on a rower or bike — and he will do a second workout a little later. I believe his early morning workout is his primary and his secondary is done late morning. Obviously, the timing must fit your own schedule.

Wanda Brenton — an up and coming CF female I have been training — along with her teammates at CrossFit 7 Mile in Cayman, follow the same process. They are killing it! Their hard work earned them a trip to the Games after a first place finish at Regionals (Latin America), and they are just getting started. Wanda utilizes smaller accessory workouts frequently throughout the week along with her coach Chris Spigner; they are learning how to max the training without overdoing it. My friend Jason Farrow, a top weight lifting coach and master weight lifter, also uses this same approach with himself as well as with his athletes.

However, you do not have to be a competitive CrossFitter to use or benefit from extra workouts; they can be effective for any athlete who wants to improve. Personally, I like to do a quick morning workout. My main workouts are at 4 in the afternoon, yet at 9 am-ish I will do a small “smoker” workout. Usually I do some light weight work because that is my need, or I may do some assistance work from the previous night’s workout. I focus on light, volume-oriented work. For instance, if I did a max upper workout on Monday night, I will come in on Tuesday morning and do some tricep, rear delt and upper back/lat work. This is also a time for pre-hab work as well, as I do a lot of shoulder pre-hab to help my shoulders stay healthy.

Many times I will do some core and/or bike along with some grip work. Due to my age, I try not to be any longer than 20 minutes total. I do 3-5 sets of any of the above mentioned and never do more then 3 or 4 exercises. I can be finished in as little as 10-15 minutes, but sometimes I may be slightly longer then 20 minutes; it all depends on my recovery and how my body is feeling. I know for me it is a big help serving as both active restoration and additional workload, but I must regulate the volume accordingly.

“The rhythm of your training”[T]here is not a scripted regimen to the extra work; rather, it should flow and constantly vary so you will hit a variety of different training needs.
The Cadets on my powerlifting team at West Point all utilize the same extra work theory. They use these smaller workouts throughout the week to supplement both their powerlifting and their PT training almost all year round. In addition, many of my friends who coach at colleges or work with pro athletes find the same results: smaller quicker extra workouts are best served in smaller quicker doses.

Working extra technique or engine work is also fine as long as you avoid going overboard. Let’s say you want to do technique work on some of your weightlifting movements — do NOT turn it into a regular workout, because that is not the purpose. If you have a heavy session on Monday, do not come in Tuesday morning before work and repeat the same workout as last night — that will do little to help you. In fact, it is far more likely to hurt you because you will become overtrained quickly.

Making It Work for You

Making It Work for You
When adding in extra workouts, do it in moderation and try not to jam it all in right out of the gate. Setting them up correctly will help you, and setting them incorrectly will detract from your progress. Understand the purpose and the goals of your extra workouts, then talk to your coach and listen to the rhythm of your training. You must read the main workout to determine if you are doing the extra work correctly.

A big problem with volume in general is that most strength athletes really really like to train, myself included. I like to lift and lift heavy at that. The largest obstacle for my crew is doing too much — when we are really clicking, that’s when we want to lift the most. It takes discipline not to overdo it because it is easy to fall into that when you are having fun.

As you may have noticed from my examples above, there is not a scripted regimen to the extra work; rather, it should flow and constantly vary so you will hit a variety of different training needs. That also helps prevent you from overtraining, to an extent. Your job as an athlete is to develop an understanding of your training needs as well as your training levels.

Know the difference: The same thing goes with extra work: if you work out too hard and/or long on your extra workouts, you won’t perform the same on your main workouts.
Of course, in the real world most people have jobs and will need to be creative with their time management in order to incorporate extra work. We all know that just getting in a regular workout can be tough some days. I understand and appreciate that fact, as we all experience scheduling challenges when it comes to training.

Start with this: try to fit in two extra workouts somewhere to start. Maybe you can do one day before work or right after if you do mornings as your main workouts, or maybe a weekend is better suited for you. If you are creative and regulate your volume, the extra work will pay dividends. Remember in the beginning that we are only talking about “extra” as 15-minute sessions at most.

Most importantly, keep in mind that the purpose of the extra workout is different from a main workout, just as a nap is different than a good night’s sleep. If you take too long of a nap, you don’t sleep right at night, yet a quick catnap can do wonders. The long nap may feel good at the time, but it is not good in the long run because it will disrupt your sleeping patterns. The same thing goes with extra work: if you work out too hard and/or long on your extra workouts, you won’t perform the same on your main workouts. Learn what works best for you.

ON LINE TRAINING BANNER
What if you had a chance to work with one of the best strength coaches in the game today? Well, here is that chance: for a limited time, Coach Rick Scarpulla is offering online training. Get programming advice and critique directly from Coach over the phone and through online contact. Get the same information as he’s giving his top athletes.

For more information, contact Coach Scarpulla: rick@myultimateadvantage.com or visit our website at myultimateadvantage.com. You can also follow Coach Scarpulla on Facebook and Twitter.

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